The String Measuring Method

Step 1

After you have lined your string with a kohl pencil, place the string where you want to create the bottom of the front of the brow and wriggle the string side to side leaving a pencil mark.

Take your string and mark from the bottom of the brow to the tail of the brow, and the hairline, giving you a guide of where you want the tails of the brow end. This marking should not be higher or lower from the base of where the front of the brow begins.

Step 2:

Place the string where you want the strokes on the top of the front of the brow to finish, wriggle string side to side.

Step 3:

We are now finding the arch of the brow, and this a very important step in your measuring – one eyebrow may be higher than the other brow. Ask your client which brow they prefer, and also check where the brow sits on the brow bone. You don’t want to create a brow that is too high or too low.

Once you have picked an arch on one brow that you want to create from, align the string to find a reference to where you will be creating an arch on the other brow. Wriggle string side to side to make your markings. Also, make a mark to the hairline on both sides of the face – this mark will be used in a later measurement.

Tip: If your client has no hairs on their brows, a technique you can use is to measure the client’s eyelids when closed and make a mark with your string or pencil on the nose.  Using your phi calipers place the section with the smallest diameter on the nose marking, and take the other end of the caliper to the top of the forehead to the hairline. The middle part of the instrument is the measurement where the arch of the brows should sit on the face.

Step 4

Now we are finding placement for where the tail of the brow will end. Place the string on the edge of the client’s nose and align with the outer corner of the eye. This is where the tail of the brow will end. Wriggle string back and forth to make a marking. 

Step 5:

Use your pencil to make a long line up to the hairline to reference this placement.

Step 6

We are now finding the placement for where the front of the brows will begin. The best way of finding this placement is to use the nose bone as a reference. Find the middle of the nose bone and place a line with your pencil for reference.

Using your small ruler, you can now create a marking on each side of the front of the brows, making sure that each side is the same measurement as the other. Make a mark on both sides with your pencil for reference. Never create the front of the brow too close to the nose as this creates an angry look. If your client has brows that have a large gap to where they should begin, you may want to take the brows further towards the nose in stages. In the perfecting session, you can always bring them in closer. Tip: do not go closer than the eye duct when creating the beginning of the brow.

Step 7

Take your calipers, and measure where you have made a mark for where the brows will begin, and measure the distance to the tail (end) of the brow. Make a marking for reference on the tail of the brow, drawing a vertical line to the hairline.

Repeat this step on the other brow.

Step 8: 

Your phi ratio calipers will show you where the arch of the brow should be placed. The distance from the beginning of the brow to the arch is the longest measurement, and from the arch to the tail the shortest measurement.  Once you have found the placement of the arch, make a marking with your pencil for reference, and draw a vertical line to the hairline. Repeat on the other brow.

Note: steps 9 – 11 is an advanced method which we will go through more in depth in your in-salon training. You may skip to step 12 after step 8 if you are struggling with steps 9 -11, but we encourage you practice all steps.

Step 9: 

Place string underneath the beginning of the client’s right brow and angle your string towards the arch marking on the left brow. Wriggle your string back and forth to make a marking. Repeat on the other brow – place string underneath the beginning of the client’s left brow and angle your string towards the arch marking of the right brow. Make a marking.

Step 10: 

Place string from the marking of the arch, to the marking of the tail of the brow, wiggle string to make a marking. We now have a reference point for above the tail of the brows.

Step 11: 

Place string underneath client’s right brow and angle your string to the vertical line of your tail marking and arch marking – this will give you the reference of the bottom of the beginning of the brow, where the brow gradually inclines towards the under-arch. You can adjust the thickness of the brow if needed when you drawer your stencil. Repeat on the left brow.

Step 12: 

Take your string and make sure that the bottom of the brows, (under the arch area), is level to each other. Wiggle string and make a marking. 

You have now completed all the markings to finalise your stencil. Once you have rounded the arches using your fine crayon eyebrow pencil, you can draw the remaining of the stencil underneath the brow, tails, and top of brows. Clean up your mapping measurements (make sure you keep your markings where the brow begins, the arches, and the tail of the brow) using a wet wipe so that the client can easily see just the stencil of the brow.

Step 13: 

We now make sure that the width/thickness of the arches, tails, and beginning of the brow stencil are the same. Repeat on both brows. Use your measuring calipers to achieve this.

Once you have completed the stencil of both of your client’s brows, it is time to show your client the brow stencil you have created for them. Allow the client to hold a hand-held mirror to view the stencil, and explain all the markings that you have made to the brow, explaining that you will be working within the stencil created. Note: The stencil can often look scary and thick to the client when they first see your markings.  Explain to your client that the brow stencil is just that – a stencil for you as the artist to work within, and that the end result after the initial procedure will not look as thick and scary. You are also allowing for minimum 20% shrinkage to occur after the healing process.  

It is suggested to show your clients a picture of a stencilled brow, and a brow just completed so they can understand in their minds visually what their brows will look like after the procedure, as the brow stencil can commonly look thicker and scarier to the client in relation to the result. 

Make sure your client understands that the beginning of the brow will not be square but will begin with curved hair strokes, (unless the client specifically asks for straight up strokes on the beginning of the brow area).  

Make any necessary adjustments if required, for example, if your client thinks the beginning of the brow is too close to the nose, adjust and re-measure the arch area using your phi ratio calipers, as the width of the whole brow will change therefore the placement of the arch will be different.  

Once the client is happy with their stencil, take out your client form and make sure they initial the area that states, “I am happy with the stencil my artist has created on my brows”.

Step 14: 

To make sure you don’t lose your stencil that you have created as you work on the brows, use your surgical marker and make small markings (dots) all around the border of your stencil, as well as above the areas where the arch begins, where the tails end and where the brow begins.

**Explain to your client that the stencil is just a reference point to create from and will always look thicker and scarier than the result. Make sure your client understands that the beginning of the brow will not be square but will begin with curved hair strokes. – I moved this paragraph to step 13…

Once you have completed your first pass of the procedure, you must sit your client up, and re-measure your stencil again, making sure that both brows are as symmetrical as possible, and that your first round of strokes are in the correct place. Adjust where required using your string and measuring calipers and eyebrow pencil.