Important factors that may affect the outcome of a cosmetic tattoo eyebrow procedure

The 3 point skin stretch

The picture below demonstrates the 3-point stretch that is the important practice to use to produce crisp beautiful results in both the digital and microblading techniques. Using your index and middle finger on your left hands and your little pinkie/little finger on your right hand, stretch the skin taught and firm. (If you are right- handed)

If you look at your skin under a microscope, you would see that the surface of your skin is not flat, it has tiny waves as shown in the image above.

  1. By stretching out the skin when you are inserting pigment into the skin, you are making sure that all layers of the epidermis and dermis are coming into contact with your blade/needle and that the same depth is created on the whole stroke that you are creating.
  2. Your pinkie finger is used as an anchor to create your pattern/stroke, as well as to stretch the skin.
  3. Your pinkie little finger, index, and middle fingers are used to create the appropriate stretch of the skin.
  4. If the appropriate stretch is not applied, you will have an uneven result, incorrect placement of pigment, and a blurry healed result.

Microblading Technique

Speed

Controlling your speed is essential when creating a microblade stroke. Do not go too fast, make sure your pace is slow and steady, allowing the depth of the stroke to be the same throughout, and also making sure that the whole surface of the blade touches the client’s skin. Do not use the tip of the blade or the back of the blade to create the end of a stroke. Keep the blade straight and flat on the skin at all times.

Digital Machine Techniqu

Digital Machine Technique

Speed

When it comes to penetrating the skin to the correct depth, your machine should be pre-set so that your needle is sitting out of the cartridge at 1 millimetre. Just glide the needle over the skin gently DO NOT push the whole needled into the skin. The needle has a ‘sewing machine’ action, coming in and out of the machine at a fast pace. 

Skin type

Younger clients tend to have more robust thicker skin, whereas more mature skin tends to be more fragile and thinner. It is important to note your pressure when working on different skin types.  You may need to pull back your pressure on more fragile thinner skin types, especially on the arch and tail area of the brow.

Skin scarring

Pigment retention can be difficult when working on scar tissue such as chickenpox scars or other related scar tissues on the brow area.  Do not overwork the area, as you may cause more damage and therefore more scarring. Explain to your client that in these areas, the pigment may fade faster than other areas of the brow, and in some instances, you may need to go a shade darker in this area or have more regular treatments on this area of the brow. Always start with a lighter colour at first, as on the perfecting session you can assess the healed coloured result on the scar tissue and go from there. 

NEVER blade or digital machine over a mole, as your client will need this area free of pigment to get their moles checked by their doctor.

If your client comes in with a pimple on the brow, or the tissue area on the brow is open/damaged for any reason, do not proceed with the procedure, as you will risk migration and the pigment fixating (refer chapter 18) on areas where the skin is open. On your website, have this information ready for your clients to read so that they have time to reschedule their appointments. 

Hand pressure- Microblading

When it comes to penetrating the skin to the correct depth, the stroke should look like a “paper cut”. This is where you know you have gone deep enough into the top layer of the Dermis of the skin, and not too shallow where the pigment will not hold.

Too much pressure will result in a blurred result, pigment migration and possible scarring.

When you have made the stroke into the skin, gently move the cut around using your fingers in a circular motion. If it looks like a “paper cut” then you know you have the correct depth.  In time you will be able to tell if your stroke depth is correct just by looking at it.

Blade sharpness

Every time you open up a disposable hand blade, check the use-by date, place it under your magnifying lamp and check for any abnormalities i.e. make sure all needles are straight and not bent and all the tiny needles flow in a neat slanted pattern.  If the needle does not look as it should, throw it away immediately into your sharps container and open and inspect another one. If you find that the blade is not breaking the skin, again dispose of appropriately, inspect and replace the blade.

Make sure that when using your hand tool, it is ALWAYS in an upright 90 degree position.  This is another important technique to master to achieve crisp strokes that will not blur.

Again, make sure that the whole surface of the blade touches the client’s skin. Do not use the tip of the blade or the base of the blade to create a stroke, or to end your stroke. Keep the blade straight and flat on the skin at all times.

Hand tool angle – Digital Machine

Make sure that when using your digital machine, you are working on a 90-degree angle for the hairstroke technique and a 45-degree angle for an ombre technique.  This is another important technique to master to achieve crisp strokes that will not blur. For an ombre brow make sure your machine is on a 45-degree angle, allowing you to build up pigment implanted into the skin slowly.

Photo source: https://lashkani.com/whats-the-difference-between-microblading-and-eyebrow-feathering-done-with-a-digital-machine/